Is your child struggling with an addiction

Our Family Program is designed to help parents like you

Addiction is not due solely to a drug’s effects. It is an expression of a person’s whole life, and is embedded within that life.  In particular, we cannot separate any form of addiction from the family in which the person with the addiction problem resides.

This does not mean that you are responsible for your your child’s addiction.  But you are implicated in it; certainly you are impacted by it.  Both the individual’s and the family’s emotional state, communication style, relationships, acceptance of responsibility, goals, and maturity play a role in the problem.

The Life Process Family Program thus addresses all of these factors — and more — as critical elements in the addiction.

You are likely to be doing the LPP Family Program as a parent or guardian. In particular, some issues facing children may occur at such an early age that there is no point to involving the child directly.

A child’s involvement can be all over the map. They may be old enough to respond to questions and exercises themselves, or else to at least react to your responses.  When they are too young for this, then you may translate what you encounter so that they can understand some of the addiction and recovery process.

Your exploring their thinking and feelings is crucial, as is their involvement in the process.

Thus the LPP Family Program involves more than your simply filling in answers and pondering readings and filling in exercises.

Participation is predicated on your engagement of the entire family.

Fortunately, Life Process Family Program coaches — male and female — have been trained in facilitating this process.

Your child can recover, with your help

Recovery for the person and the family is not a simple pathway, but it is a clear one that engages your and your family’s self-respect and helps you and them to develop alternative life choices and purposes, built on your personal and family values.

The LPP Family Program will allow you to do this.  But your role in making changes is the essential cog in the process.

If you are worried about a family member’s or a partner’s addictive behavior and its impact on you and the family, start with the following questions:

  • Is my my child participating fully as a member of our family?  Or does their attention lay outside the family?
  • How is my child functioning outside of the home, in terms of work, school, friends, activities?  Are they leading positive, productive lives?
  • Have family relationships been deteriorating?
  • What do my friends and relations think about how my family is functioning?
  • Do I dread interacting with the family member or my partner, particularly as concerns the addictive activity?

If these questions are hitting an uncomfortable nerve with you, then perhaps you owe it to yourself and your child to equip yourself with the tools and support that you and your child needs.

watch the video download sample content

If you think the Life Process Program is for you get started with us today.